The results of the Electoral Commission’s latest survey are in – here’s what the public thinks about voting

thumbnail_phil-thompson-4The results of the Electoral Commission’s latest public opinion survey on the experience of participation in elections have been published today. Phil Thompson, the Commission’s Head of Research, outlines the results. Overall the findings are positive, with confidence that elections are well run increasing by from 66 per cent to 76 per cent in the last year. Satisfaction with the voter registration system has also increased, from 75 per cent to 80 per cent. However, satisfaction continues to be lowest among younger age groups which are the least likely to be registered to vote.

The Electoral Commission aims to put voters’ interests at the centre of everything we do. To achieve this, it’s essential to find out how people think and feel about the electoral process. Like many organisations, we use public opinion research to help us do this.

We conduct a public opinion survey after every poll held in order to monitor the experience of participating in specific elections. In addition, we conduct the ‘Winter Tracker’, an annual UK-wide survey, every December. This covers a range of electoral issues and is designed to provide an overview of public sentiment towards the process of voting and democracy in the UK more broadly.

After the significant polls of 2016, the results this year show that confidence in and satisfaction with the system overall have improved. Three quarters (76 per cent) are confident that elections are well run in Great Britain and Northern Ireland, compared to 66 per cent in 2015. In line with this, 77 per cent said that they are satisfied with the process of voting at elections, up from 68 per cent in 2015.

thumbnail_graph1

As might be expected, those that participate in the electoral process tend to have a more positive view of it than those that do not. Those that say they ‘always vote’ are significantly more likely to say that they are confident that elections are well run (82 per cent) than those that say they ‘sometimes vote’ (62 per cent) and never vote (48 per cent).

Continue reading